Coronavirus cat injected – coronavirus outbreak map

Researchers take coronavirus from human patients and infect cats with the coronavirus.

Each cat is kept in a cage with another cat that has a negative test for coronavirus.

Within five days, the coronavirus was found in all new open cats.

None of the cats showed any coronavirus symptoms.

“There was no sneezing, no coughing, no body temperature, no weight loss,” Hoffman said. “If any pet owner looked at them … they didn’t notice anything.”

Scientists leading the study said more research was needed into whether the coronavirus could spread from humans to cats.

Health experts downplayed that possibility.

The American Veterinary Medical Association said in a statement that a lab could be deliberately infected in a laboratory. “” This does not mean that the virus would be easily infected under natural conditions. “

Anyone concerned about the risk should use “common sense hygiene”, said virus expert Peter Hoffman. “Don’t kiss your pet and keep surfaces clean to reduce the risk of getting an infected virus,” he said.

The University of Wisconsin’s Department of Veterinary Medicine led the laboratory experiment, and the results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday. Federal grants for work.

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In A study published today Scientists from the United States and Japan have reported in the New England Land Journal of Medicine that cats in the laboratory could easily become infected with SARS-COV-2, a virus that causes COVID-1, and that the virus could be transmitted to other cats.

The study was led by a professor of pathobiological sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Veterinary Medicine, Yoshihiro Cavo, in which researchers isolated three cats from SARS-COVE-2 in humans.

The next day, researchers removed the nasal passages of cats and were able to detect the virus in two animals. Within three days, they found the virus in all cats.

The next day, after investigators transmitted the virus to the first three cats, they placed another cat in their cage. The researchers did not administer the SARS-Cove-2 virus to these cats.

Each day, researchers took nasal and rectal swabs from all six cats to check for the presence of the virus. Within two days, one of the previously uncertified cats was transmitting the virus, found in the nasal swab, and within six days, all those cats were transmitting the virus. No rectal swabs contain the virus.

Photo: Yoshihiro Kawaoka

Yoshihiro Kavoka

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Each cat shed SARS-CoV-2 from its nasal passages for up to six days. The virus was not fatal, and no cats showed signs of illness. All the cats eventually cleared the virus.

“It was a great discovery for us – the cats had no symptoms,” says Kawoka, who also holds a professorship at Tokyo University. Kavoka is also helping to lead the effort to make the human COVID-19 vaccine coroflu.

Research suggests that cats may be able to become infected with the virus when individuals or other cats are positive for SARS-CoV-2. It is as follows A study published in Science Scientists at the Chinese Institute of Agricultural Sciences have shown that cats (and ferrets) can be infected and potentially transmit the virus. The virus can be transmitted to humans through contact with respiratory droplets and saliva.

“It’s something people have to keep in mind,” said Peter Hoffman, a research professor at UW-Madison, who helped lead the study. “If they are living separately at home and are worried about passing COVID-1 to children and spouses, they should also worry about giving it to the animal.”

Both researchers advise that people with COVID-1 of symptoms avoid contact with cats. They advise cat owners to keep pets indoors, to limit their cats’ contact with other humans and animals.

Kawaoka is concerned about the welfare of animals. The World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stated that “there is no justification for compromising with friends in their interests.”

Human viruses carry the greatest risk for other humans. There is no evidence that cats easily transmit the virus to humans, nor are there any documents showing that humans became infected with COVID-19 due to contact with cats.

There have been confirmed cases of cats becoming infected through close contact with humans infected with the virus, and many large cats at the Bronx Zoo have tested positive for the virus.

For example, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, two cats in two private homes in New York State tested positive for COVID-1. One was at home with a person who had been diagnosed with the virus. The cats showed mild signs of respiratory disease and were expected to recover completely.

More cats have also tested positive for COVID-1 for close contact with human friends, says director Sandra Newbury. UW – Madison Shelter Medical Program. Newbury is conducting research to test animal-shelter cats in various U.S. states that were previously detected in human COVID-1 cases.

Newbury says: “Animal welfare organizations are working hard to keep humans in captivity and keep pets at bay. “It’s a stressful time for everyone, and people need the comfort and support that pets can provide before now.”

Peter Halfman, who helped lead the study, said: “People should not forget this. “If they are living separately at home and are worried about passing COVID-1 to children and spouses, they should also worry about giving it to the animal.”

Newbury has worked with the CDC and the American Veterinary Medical Association to develop recommendations for potentially exposed pets for shelters, which they can do when they are hospitalized or unable to care for the cause of their illness.

UW-Madison’s study empirically confirms that cats may be infected, although the risk of natural infection from SARS-COV-2 appears to be significantly lower, Newbury says. The program tested 22 animals, but no positive polymerase chain reaction tests were performed.

“Cats are still more likely to get COVID-1 than cats,” says Keith Poulsen, director of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, who recommends that pets talk to veterinarians first. Examine their animals. The test should target populations of cats and other species that appear susceptible to viruses and virus transmission.

With regard to pets, “we are targeting companion animals in communal habitats with at-risk populations, such as nursing homes and allied living facilities,” says Poulsen. “There is a delicate balance of further information through testing and the limited resources and clinical implications of positive trials.”

So, what should a pet owner do?

Ruthan Chun, Dean of Clinical Affairs at UW Veterinary Care, offers the following advice:

  • If your pet lives indoors with you and is not in contact with any COVID-19 positive person, this pet is crushed, and is safe in interaction with your pet.

  • If you are COVID-19 positive, you should limit your interactions with your pet to avoid the risk of contracting the virus.

“Animal owners should always include pets and other animals in the emergency preparedness plan, as well as a two-week supply of food and medicine,” she says. “Animal care should also be prepared if you have to be quarantined or hospitalized due to illness.”

The study was supported by the United Nations and Allied Diseases and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development.

Last month, two domestic cats in different parts of New York State tested positive for coronavirus after mild respiratory illness.

They thought of taking it from people in the house or in the neighborhood.

Some tigers and lions at the Bronx Zoo have also tested positive for the virus, with few other animals around the world.

Those cases and the new laboratory experiment “require a public health effort to identify and further research the potential range of human-cat-human transmission,” the authors write.

Guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that, given the limited information available so far, pets are considered “low” risk of transmitting corovirus to humans.

The veterinary group said “no evidence has been found that animals, including animals, which may have been accidentally infected by humans, played a role in the spread of COVID-1 in.” It emphasizes that person-to-person transmission is spreading the epidemic worldwide.

Although this group states that many pets and humans get sick, hygiene is always important: wash your hands before touching a pet, and keep your pet and its food and water containers clean.

Huffman, whose two cats are sleeping near him, is more concerned about the animal, where an infected animal can transmit the coronavirus to many other domestic animals where large groups of animals are kept.

Sandra Newbury, director of the UW-Madison Shelter Medical Program, says more human cats have also tested positive for COVID-19 after close contact with their human mates. Newbury is conducting research to test animal-shelter cats in various U.S. states that were previously detected in human COVID-1 cases.

It shows a catEach cat shed SARS-CoV-2 from its nasal passages for up to six days. The virus was not fatal, and no cats showed signs of illness. All the cats eventually cleared the virus.

Newbury says: “Animal welfare organizations are working hard to keep humans in captivity and keep pets at bay. “This is a stressful time for everyone, and before now people need the comfort and support that pets provide.”

Newbury has worked with the CDC and the American Veterinary Medical Association to develop recommendations for potentially exposed pets for shelters, which they can do when they are hospitalized or unable to care for the cause of their illness. The UW-Madison study empirically confirms that cats can be infected, although the risk of natural infection from SARS-Cove-2 appears to be significantly lower, Newbury says. The program tested 22 animals, but no positive polymerase chain reaction tests were performed.

“Cats are still more likely to get COVID-1 than cats,” says Keith Poulsen, director of the Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, who recommends that pets talk to veterinarians first. Examine their animals. The test should target populations of cats and other species that appear susceptible to viruses and virus transmission.

With regard to pets, “we are targeting companion animals in communal habitats with at-risk populations, such as nursing homes and allied living facilities,” says Paulsen. “There is a delicate balance of further information through testing and the limited resources and clinical implications of positive trials.”

So, what should a pet owner do?

https://abc3340.com/news/nation-world/cats-with-no-syferences-spread-virus-to-other-cats-in-lab-test


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